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Home > Author > Tricia Stewart Shiu
 
Tricia Stewart Shiu

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Member Since: Oct, 2011

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  Tricia Stewart Shiu           

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Tricia Stewart Shiu is an award-winning screenwriter, author, and playwright, but her passion lies in crafting mystical stories. Shiu's Moa series - Moa, The Statue of Ku, and Iron Shinto - sparked by her firsthand encounter with an ancient Hawaiian spirit, takes readers on a journey of exploration through her world of spiritual healing. Each chapter of the books begins with a meditative ritual


Background Information

I love Hawaii. The minute I step off the plane, I feel transformed. That is why I was thrilled when my husband and I booked a visit to see his relatives in Honolulu, Hawaii in October of 2006. We brought our daughter, then three, and packed light.

Our condo was close to parks, and monuments and I loved wandering around, soaking up the history and indulging in local food. I even tried poi and liked it!

The morning after we arrived, I rose early, around 6am, pushed my daughter’s stroller through the quiet, cool morning air. It felt like such a gift to experience Honolulu before the rest of the island was up.

We had a hearty island breakfast and headed out to the beach. Our favorite was Kuhio Beach. The water was calm and protected by a breakwater. Our daughter enjoyed digging and splashing and my husband and I sat sit nearby without worrying about the strong current.

Afterwards, we headed back to our condominium ate a light lunch and took a luxurious siesta. After my daughter went down for her nap, I wandered over to a beautiful overstuffed couch and dozed. The fresh sea air and sun lulled me into a light sleep—the kind where I felt like I was awake, but I was actually deeply asleep.

I heard a voice say my name and a part of me awoke. I use the word “a part” because I could definitely feel my body touching the soft material on the couch. And yet, another part was keenly aware of a young woman with dark hair standing over me. It felt real, but dream-like, so I decided to go with it and ask her her name.

She pronounced a long Hawaiian string of letters, which seemed to go on for minutes. After repeating the name three or four times, she told me to call her “Moa.” Through my exhausted, sleepy haze, I remember being skeptical. If this was, indeed, a dream, I would ask as many questions as possible. So I did.

Why was she here? Where did she come from? How could I be sure she was who she said she was?

Instead of any answers, she flashed a mental picture of a woman and said that she was a long lost friend of my husband’s. She told me her name and explained that my husband’s family and she had lost touch 15 years before and had been orbiting around one another trying to reconnect.

I awoke from that nap, slightly groggy. That was an indication that I was definitely asleep. Perhaps it was just my creativity kicking into overdrive, I reasoned, and decided to go on with my day. We walked to a park with my daughter and began playing. Suddenly there was a squeal and my husband and I turned to see the woman from my dream charging toward us with her arms stretched out wide. As she spoke, I tried to gather my wits. Here was the same woman from my dream, someone I’d only seen a mental picture of, and she was standing on the grass right in front of me.

She and my husband exchanged numbers and promised to keep in touch. For the next few hours, I tried to make sense of what happened. I had never had an experience like this before, but there was no denying that I saw a picture in a dream before I met someone and then they showed up in real life.

When I went to sleep that evening, Moa visited again. She answered the other questions I’d asked earlier that afternoon and wanted me to know that I was protected and should share my experience with the world. Since I had never shared—or encountered for that matter—any kind of metaphysical experience, I had no words or context and asked for help. How on earth, I asked, was I supposed to share such undocumented, unsubstantiated, unusual information?

She said that our world exists on many levels which all play simultaneously. Her analogy was of a DVR. Several shows can be playing at the same time but are on different tuners. That, she said, is where she existed.

When I awoke, I began writing and continued to do so. The story evolved into “Moa,” then the sequel, “Statue of Ku.” My daughter, now 7, took the cover photo and illustrated, as well. The photo was taken a few years ago on the North Shore as we played on the beach. The artwork has been compiled over the last two years.

Since my visit with Moa, I began an extensive and sometimes circuitous search to explain my metaphysical experience. I took classes on mediumship, Huna, energy work and through my education, I learned to create healing essential oils and elixir sprays and incorporated that information in the book. Not only did my experience with Moa inspire me and guide me through four and a half of the most challenging years of my life, I also believe that writing about those events and including information I received about that inspiration and guidance, brought my own deep physical, mental, emotional and spiritual transformation and healing. Writing, editing and publishing “Moa” has opened doors to a new way of understanding myself, those around me and the energy we share.

Whatever your belief or understanding of the metaphysical world, I believe that if one person is transformed through learning, then we are all transformed. I truly believe Moa came through in this work and, just as I connected with Moa as I wrote, those who read the book will experience her as well.

 

Accomplishments

The Moa Book Series - A YA Sci Fi Fantasy Mystical Adventure Series includes Moa (Book 1), Statue of Ku (Book 2) and Iron Shinto (Book 3).

"Iron Shinto" has earned numerous awards and honors at several national and international book festivals including 'Runner Up' at The Great Southeast Book Festival, 'Honorable Mention' in both The Los Angeles Book Festival in the Young Adult category and in Portland Oregon's Great Northwest Book Festival.

"Iron Shinto" also was named 'Runner Up' in the Beach Book Festival and 'Honorable Mention' in the renowned New York Book Festival.

Favorite Links

Moa Book

Moa Book Blog

Human Being Company




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