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Rex A Owens

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September gardening in Madison
by Rex A Owens   
Not "rated" by the Author.
Last edited: Saturday, November 27, 2010
Posted: Saturday, November 27, 2010

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September gardening tips.

 You can extend the growing cycle of some plants through the winter by taking cuttings and putting them in the windowsill. Plants that are easy to winter over include: geraniums, begonias, coleus and fuchsia.

Other plants need to be removed from the soil and stored for the winter. Cut back all growth from the plant, remove the soil and then store in peat moss, wood shavings, newspaper or sawdust. Plants that can winter over with this storage method include: dahlias, cannas, caladiums and tuberous begonias. For the best success wait until after the first frost to store these plants and be sure they are in a cool, dark location.

You can continue to enjoy the annuals in containers by moving them to the porch, garage or in the house when there is a chance of frost. They can be moved back outdoors during the day or when temperatures stay above freezing.

Move your hibiscus and any other tropical plants to their indoor locations for the winter. It is best for them to be near a south facing window or even better to use artificial light during the winter.

It’s never too late to begin planning for your 2011 garden. Take pictures of your garden to use as a reference for next year. Begin planning how to rotate crops in your vegetable garden and consider companion plants. Jot down a few notes on what worked and what didn’t work and what you may want to do differently next year.

   



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