AuthorsDen.com   Join Free! | Login    
USA Independence Day
   Popular! Books, Stories, Articles, Poetry
Where Authors and Readers come together!

SIGNED BOOKS    AUTHORS    eBOOKS new!     BOOKS    STORIES    ARTICLES    POETRY    BLOGS    NEWS    EVENTS    VIDEOS    GOLD    SUCCESS    TESTIMONIALS

Featured Authors:  Phillip Rice, iS Zachary, iDavid Page, iBonnie Milani, iGisele Vincent-Page, iRussell Williams, iA. Bell, i

  Home > Drama > Stories
Popular: Books, Stories, Articles, Poetry     

Dana Reed

· + Follow Me
· Contact Me
· Books
· Articles
· Poetry
· Stories
· Blog
· 144 Titles
· 312 Reviews
· Save to My Library
· Share with Friends!
·
Member Since: Jul, 2004

   newsletter

Subscribe to the Dana Reed Newsletter. Enter your name and email below and click "sign me up!"
Name:
Email:
Dana Reed, click here to update your pages on AuthorsDen.

Books by Dana Reed
Running Out of Yets by Serena Foster-new excerpt
By Dana Reed
Saturday, April 09, 2005

Not rated by the Author.

Share    Print  Save   Follow

Recent stories by Dana Reed
· A Thing of Dread
· Untitled--Horror Novel--Update
· Vengeance--New excerpt 06/26/05
· The Fifth Deadly Sin--New Excerpt
           >> View all 5


Profound statement used by addicted individuals. Serena's a friend and wanted to run this past some readers.

DEDICATION

  To those who suffer from the misconception that drugs are glamorous, harmless, and certainly not addicting. To Cedelia, who helped more than she'll ever know, and who kept my head above the sludge. Most of all, though, to `Robin Beecher'; may you find answers before running out of yets.

 

FOREWORD

RUNNING OUT OF YETS is an old, and profound, expression used in Twelve Step programs, generally employed when a member is in denial concerning the effects of their never ending battle with addiction, and some of the self-inflicted crimes committed while under the influence.

 

One usually begins by saying, `I haven't been arrested, yet' or `I haven't been in a mental institution, yet', followed by `I haven't tried suicide, yet'. But when all of those things have happened, about the only thing left unaccomplished is, `I haven't died, yet, and, inevitably, they're RUNNING OUT OF YETS. 

 

RUNNING OUT OF YETS


BOOK ONE—REFLECTIONS


 


 


Colin snapped his fingers and the two men moved. Just a simple snap and Robin's death was a sure thing. "We're gonna do this one up good!" he said while the two dragged her arms first, her feet scraping through the residue from the spilled urine bucket. "Take this cracker bitch to that boarded up place two blocks from here and beat her till her own momma don't recognize her... Beat her till she's dead!"


"Mommy, please help me! Please, Mommy, please! I love you, Mommy! Please come here and help me and I'll be good. I promise. I'll behave. Just help me, Mommy. Mommmmyyyyy! Help me! Oh, Pleaaassseee... I'll never do anything wrong again. I promise. Oh, Mommy!"


People say when you're about to die, the past races through the conscious mind like road signs on a speedway. But Robin fought the memories: those grisly vignettes now taunting her because they'd been premonitions. This was the only way it could have ended.


“Get up, bitch, and walk!" one of the men said, pulling her roughly to her feet. "You stink so bad I wanna puke! Look at ya. Filthy, bitch!" Then he slammed her across the back of the head with an open hand, nearly knocking her unconscious. It was his job to drag a grime-covered, foul smelling, female - whose clothing was caked with human waste - two blocks to kill her. And he resented it. But he was too afraid of Colin to refuse.


Both men caught her under the arms and half-carried her now, while one gave the other hell for the head blow. "What're ya nuts?" he shouted. "Colin says we hafta wait till we're away from Maggie's."


"But, man, she smells awful! I ain't never smelled nothin' like it."


"Turn your head away and it won't be so bad! That's what I'm doin'."


Turn your head away. Robin had been doing this same thing for years. Turning her head, her thoughts, her conscience, and just about everything she could away from the realities of life. She could see her mistakes now, but now was a tad bit late.


With her head throbbing from the blow, and her mind too close to snapping to fight, Robin let go, and allowed the vignettes to take her back to the beginning. At least as far back as she could remember. Back to the time her demise began; to the night the memories of Jim Smith, and his distorted version of commitment, had come back with such vividness Robin had given up, though she couldn't see it then.


To the same night a man she imagined was a pathological liar and a fraud - and dangerously so - had reentered her mother's life. While she wasn't certain what had gone on with Amy, the two had been close enough for Robin to pretty much guess, as she could pretty much guess what had transpired in private with the rest of the characters in her one act play on the subject of dysfunction...


And so she drifted back to the night...



 
 

       Web Site: Dana's Book Den

Want to review or comment on this short story?
Click here to login!


Need a FREE Reader Membership?
Click here for your Membership!


Reviewed by S. Reisner 6/10/2005
I really like it. I would read more. :)
Reviewed by m j hollingshead 4/12/2005
interesting read

Popular Drama Stories
1. The Mexican Swimmer - Book-Noir
2. Wildflower
3. A Bad Day At School.
4. asylum...
5. 'My Child May Be In Danger!' (Part Two)
6. All For Keith.
7. 'Lord, Where Is My Miracle?'
8. Chapter Two-from-My life as a white, femal
9. Out Of The Blue. (Part Two)
10. -Post Traumatic-

Flaherty's Crossing by Kaylin kaylin@kaylinmcfarren.com

A compelling and imaginative story, not just about death but about life and emotional growth, a broken woman's journey towards learning to trust again...  
BookAds by Silver, Gold and Platinum Members