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The Solo Oboe
By Miller H Caldwell
Last edited: Tuesday, February 19, 2008
Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2008



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50 year old Fleur Richter leaves Germany in 1939 and returns to Scotland. But with a son in the SS and an aging mother in Scotland will Gerhardt Eicke of the Hamburg Gestapo or Sir Anthony Pitt-Stevenson of MI6 make use of her bi-lingual gift?


                      THE SOLO OBOE

A 88 MINUTE FILM SCRIPT IN FINAL DRAFT 7 INDUSTRY FORMAT.                      FOR OPTION
                      by
                Miller Caldwell              Adapted from the novel  
                  Operation Oboe
                by Miller Caldwell
           Published by Harvest Jones


FADE IN
1 EXT OHLSDORF CEMETERY HAMBURG MAY 1935   DAY
Branches of sycamore trees lovingly caress eachother in the peaceful cemetery grounds. A funeral party gathers round the grave of Dr. WILLY RICHTER. Many of his former patients are in the background. FLEUR RICHTER(49) tightly holds her sonís hand. Otto Bruce Richter (16) stands smartly beside her in his Hitler Youth uniform. The Pastor stands over the grave.
PASTOR
Dust to dust, ashes to ashes. In the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Amen.
The Pastor throws soil over the grave. Fleur steps forward and does the same, then takes from her purse, a sprig of heather and throws it into the grave. It lands on the coffin and masks the brass nameplate. Fleurís brother-in-law, KARL RICHTER observes and approaches, gently laying his hand on Fleurís shoulder.
KARL RICHTER
    Willy would have liked that, Fleur.
FLEUR
Thank you Karl. He loved our holidays in Scotland.
The mourning party of Karl, his wife Renate and Otto leave the grave-side and begin to walk down the path to leave the cemetery. GERHARD EICKE approaches and extends his hand
HERR EICKE
Frau Richter, my condolences.
They exchange a brief handshake.
HERR EICKE (CONTíD)
Excuse me, Herr Gerhard Eicke. I am one of your sonís training officers. Otto is a fine young man and one of the best in the Hitler Youth.
Fleur looks troubled by his remark. She is apprehensive of the bellicose direction of Germanyís one party State.
HERR EICKE (CONTíD)
If there is anything I can do for you in your time of need, then Frau Richter, I hope you would not hesitate to get in touch with me.
FLEUR
Oh...well, thank you Herr Eicke. I will bear your kind offer in mind.
HERR EICKE
Iíll leave my card.
Herr Eicke takes his personal card from his pocket and hands it to Fleur.
HERR EICKE (CONTíD)

Again, Frau Richter, my condolences.
Fleur smiles, and places his card in her black velvet purse and proceeds to walk along the path while Otto salutes the departing Herr Eicke.
KARL RICHTER
I hope you would turn to family first.
FLEUR
Of course I would Karl. I have no intention of contacting Herr Eicke.
KARL RICHTER
Gerhard Eicke has a day job too. I know who he is. I can tell a Gestapo man a mile away.
FLEUR
But heís a training officer with the Hitler Youth too! Karl, I think you may have to speak to Otto from time to time, for me.
Otto is indignant.
OTTO RICHTER
Mother, heís fun. We all know heís in the Gestapo but why should that bother us? We learn lots of things with him. And we get sweets too. Herr Eicke is good to us , heís a good leader.
FLEUR
That may be so, Otto. But remember you are the man of the house now. You must study hard at school and make your father proud of you.
Otto nods. Renate Richter, Karlís wife,  gives a side look at Fleur.
The family leave the cemetery and enter the car which awaits them. Fleur takes a white handkerchief and dries a tear from her eye. She turns to look back to the cemetery in the direction of the grave of her late husband.
FLEUR (CONTíD)
Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of one of His Saints.
She smiles.
FLEUR (CONTíD)
The Psalmist, as always, said it perfectly.

2 INT HAMBURG FLAT MARCH 1939  DAY
Otto is reading a book at the dining room table. Fleur is seated by the fire.
FLEUR
Otto, please sit with me for a moment.
Otto looks up from his book.
OTTO RICHTER
Whatís the matter mother?
FLEUR
Just come for a moment. I wish to discuss some things with you.
Otto marks his page and closes his book then comes to sit opposite his mother by the fire. Fleur smiles at him.
FLEUR (CONTíD)
What a handsome young man you have turned out to be.
Otto smiles.
FLEUR (CONTíD)
Your father has set aside an amount of marks for you when you are twenty-one. Spend it wisely when the time comes. It is his final gift to you.
OTTO RICHTER
Yes, I know about that.
FLEUR
Otto, I have also come to a decision. One which I have thought through for some time as you know. It requires you to make a decision too. 
OTTO RICHTER
Mother, what are you talking about?
Fleur takes a deep breath. She stands up and goes to draw the heavy velvet curtains. She turns to face Otto.
FLEUR
Otto, I am not German. And you are only partly German. I will return to Scotland soon, to live with my mother. In due course, I can teach German and undertake translation work.
Otto nods. He is accepting of his motherís intentions.
FLEUR (CONTíD)
  You have been on holiday to Scotland three times already now. You know the country and the people. Your English is good and you could make a good life there. I am sure you would easily make new friends.
Otto shakes his head.
OTTO RICHTER
Mother, I can not go with you. You must decide yourself. I am based with the motorized infantry regiment commanded by SS Standardenfuhrer Carl-Marie Demelhumer. Mother, I have taken my oath of allegiance to Hitler. My destiny lies with the Fatherland. There is no other way.
Fleur smiles and nods her head,
FLEUR
Be true to yourself. I will always be your Mother but Otto, it pains me to think I will be leaving you in such times of uncertainty.
Otto stands up. He embraces his mother. In the privacy of eachotherís arms comes the forgiveness, the gratitude for the past and the necessary permission for each to go their separate ways.

3 INT HAMBURG FLAT HALLWAY 7 MAY 1939   DAY
Boxes suitcases and a trunk are piled high in the hallway. On top of this pile lies an open black box with purple velvet inlay indented to protect an oboe. The oboe is missing.
(CUT TO)
4 INT HAMBURG FLAT LOUNGE  DAY
In the Lounge with only a hearth rug and curtains remaining, a fire is lit. Fleur paces the floorboards awaiting the lorry to transport her goods to the Hamburg docks. Her fingers cover the keyholes of the oboe; her lips seize the double reed and she plays part of the Aria: Bist du bei mir.  When she stops playing, she hears the front door bell. She leaves the lounge and enters the hall, placing the oboe on top of its case.
5 INT HAMBURG FLAT  HALLWAY DAY
Fleur is taken aback when she opens the front door. It is not the removal men.
FLEUR
Oh,  Herr Eicke! I was not expecting you.
HERR EICKE
No, Frau Richter, but I have been standing for the last few minutes at your door listening to your harmonious music. You play the oboe very well. Johann Sebastian Bach.   Beautiful music, cultured, German.
FLEUR
Only attributed to JS Bach, Herr Eicke.  Originally composed by one of the first valve trumpeters, Heinrich Stolzel to be precise.
HERR EICKE
You know your music, Frau Richter.
Herr Eicke enters the apartment uninvited. Fleur stands aside to let him in.
HERR EICKE (CONTíD)
It was remiss of me, I agree, not to notify you that I intended to see you before you returned to Scotland.
FLEUR
You knew I was returning to Scotland?
HERR EICKE
Oh yes. Before Otto left the Hitler Youth he told me his next of kin would be Karl and Renate Richter and I naturally asked why not you. Then I learned you would be leaving Germany.
FLEUR
I see. But as Otto is now with the motorized infantry unit, I thought you would have said your farewells when he left the Hitler Youth.
HERR EICKE
Not left, Frau Richter, graduated from the Hitler Youth. Yes, we have said our good-byes but it is you I wish to speak to today. Can we retire to the lounge?
6 INT HAMBURG FLAT LOUNGE  DAY
Fleur leads him through to the fire lit room.
FLEUR
There are no seats, I am sorry. But at least it is warmer here.
HERR EICKE
I wish you a safe journey to Scotland.
Fleur is relieved to hear this remark. She relaxes and smiles.
FLEUR
Thank you Herr Eicke.
HERR EICKE
You will leave with fond memories of our land and of course your much respected late husband.  But Karl and Renate, and especially Otto, you will miss them?
FLEUR
Herr Eicke, of course I will, but these are family matters which I have attended to. I do not require your assistance, thank you,
HERR EICKE
You are quite right. Of course I would not interfere in domestic arrangements.
Herr Eicke begins to pace up and down the room.
HERR EICKE (CONTíD)

But we are all insignificant as individuals. You can not help but realize that Germany is well on its way to recapture its prominent and rightful position in Europe once more, and that England is, how shall I say, sympathetic to our cause.
FLEUR
It always amuses me to hear that Germany has so much in common with England, or to be more correct, Britain.
HERR EICKE
Forgive me. Yes, Great Britain, you are right. The British Royal family have Hanovarian connections, the English are Saxons from central Europe like us and of course the Scots are pure bred Vikings, not so?
FLEUR
Well some are, while most are from the lowlands but what interest is this to you?
Herr Eicke takes a cigarette from his silver cigarette case marked with a white swastika on its cover.  He lights up, takes a lung full of smoke and blows it out towards the ceiling.
HERR EICKE
Since 1912 you have been a German wife.  You are the mother of a brave German soldier and so I expect you will retain a firm loyalty to the ideals of our Nationhood in all its aspects.
FLEUR
Yes, of course.
HERR EICKE
It would be good for you to keep in touch with me. Not on a personal basis of course, although I should always be favoured if you would value my friendship.
FLEUR
Herr Eicke, I have chosen to make a new life in Scotland. I can not see how I can possibly be of any assistance.
HERR EICKE
Forres, in the north of Scotland?
FLEUR
However did you know that?
HERR EICKE
Otto has only told me the truth. He told me you would be staying with your mother, in Forres. Not so?
FLEUR
Well, yes. I have to go somewhere when I arrive.
HERR EICKE
We have our contacts in that area.
FLEUR
I doubt that! What a claim! Itís a remote part of northern Scotland. And you tell me you have agents there. Most unlikely!
Herr Eicke walks over to the window looks out into the street then slowly turns round, a shadowing figure surrounded by the window frame.
HERR EICKE
You know the airbase at Lossiemouth? The garrison at Fort George?
Fleur hesitates.
FLEUR
If you know all these things then what use am I?
HERR EICKE
Frau Richter, our agents may not have your ability to speak such fluent English. They may need some assistance some reassurance perhaps, just a chance to speak to someone who knows both countries, both cultures.
FLEUR
I would have no hesitation in helping any stranger if they needed assistance whether they be German or any other nationality.
HERR EICKE
Yes, but should there be a war, would you help us too? Just where would your loyalties lie?
FLEUR
Why would Britain be at war with Germany?
HERR EICKE
Of course not! But should it come to war, you realize the Gestapo has to secure its borders.
FLEUR
Well of course. But Herr Eicke, I think you have a lively mind. You seem to enjoy playing mind games!
HERR EICKE
Then Iíll make myself more clear.
Your sister-in-law Renate and her husband Karl, Ottoís guardians, we donít want any weakness do we?
Fleur frowns. She clasps her hands together.
HERR EICKE (CONTíD)
Most loyal Germans  are keen to attend local rallies when the opportunity arises.  I think I can say quite confidently that neither Karl nor Renate attend such grand occasions. They may have to be given some encouragement.
Fleur is incensed. She raises her voice
FLEUR
And just what do you mean by that?
HERR EICKE
Calm down! Calm down. Times are changing, Frau Richter.  If Karl and Renate donít want to change, then I must see to it that they do. Every one must, no exception. We must all serve and support the Fuhrer.
FLEUR
Karl and Renate do, as does Otto. They would not appreciate what you are saying.
HERR EICKE
Itís my job to mend the cracks. Frau Richter, you donít see the cracks do you?
FLEUR
I only see what is right.
HERR EICKE
Exactly. We agree.

FLEUR
Then what are you really asking of me?
HERR EICKE
Nothing at present. We will contact you when we need to. Frau Richter, I am glad you see the need to remain loyal to the Fatherland. Rest assured that Renate and Karl will be fine. As I said, you will hear from me at the right time.
Fleur looks into the flames. The door bell rings.
HERR EICKE (CONTíD)
Your removal men. I musty be going.
Herr Eicke moves towards the fire, throws the remainder of his cigarette on to the fire, buttons up his long coat and offers his hand to Fleur.
HERR EICKE (CONTíD)
It has been my pleasure knowing you. We will meet again, of that I am sure.
In the meantime, I wish you a safe voyage.
They shake hands firmly. Herr Eicke replaces his felt hat on his head and strides through the lounge into the hall.

7 INT   HALLWAY   DAY
Herr Eicke opens the front door, pushes aside two startled men in brown overalls, and departs.
8. EXT ABERDEEN HARBOUR  DAY.
The Grampian Empress has docked in Aberdeen Port. The gangways are busy with passengers descending and streaming into the arrival customs lounge. Uniformed crew are around to assist.
V/O
Aberdeen Press & Journal. Get your copy. 3 pence. Aberdeen Press and Journal
9. INT CUSTOMS DESKS  DAY
Passengers stream through the Customs area. Fleur is among them carrying her oboe case. A man in front of her is approached by an official and taken aside to a table with his bag. Fleur passes through customs and onto the open hall in which many friends and relatives are gathering to welcome passengers. Two men in overcoats and Trilby hats and gloves approach Fleur. They stand in her way.
MR. DYNES
Mrs. Fleur Richter?
FLEUR
Yes. I am.
MR. DYNES
My name is Mr.... WILLIAM DYNES. Security Services. Frau Richter I am arresting you on suspicion of being an agent of the German government.
Fleur holds both hands to her cheeks. She gasps. She has an expression of dismay.
FLEUR
This is nonsense. Utter nonsense.
MR. DYNES
Please step this way.
Mr.... Dynes points to a door and they proceed towards it. Mr.... Shadbolt opens it. They enter and Fleur is pointed to a chair. There is a table at which Mr.... Dynes sits with Fleur opposite. The walls are plain.
10 INT SMALL SQUARE ROOM IN PORT TERMINAL  DAY
MR. SHADBOLT
Were you expecting to be met by family?
FLEUR
No. My mother is elderly. I was going to take the train to Forres.
Mr.... Dynes takes off his gloves.
MR. DYNES
Mr.... SHADBOLT and I have been instructed by the security service, MI5, to detain you from this voyage to Aberdeen and to ascertain your real purpose of leaving Germany.
Fleur sits on the edge of her chair, looks up to Mr.... Dynes with a slight smile.
FLEUR
To think a homecoming would end like this.
Fleur throws her hands in the air.
MR. DYNES
A German name, a son in the German Army, and suddenly at a time of tension, you decide to return to Scotland. Well, these things I can not overlook.
Fleur raises one hand and opens her palm.
FLEUR
On the other hand, I am Scottish and I have been under house arrest during the First World War in Germany. I have an aging mother in Scotland and I have no connection with political forces in either Germany or Britain.  (Pause) I think your case must be weak.
Mr....Dynes pauses to consider her protestation before delivering his coup de grace.
MR. DYNES
A solid defense. But with a crack. You can not deny you are under instruction, if not at the mercy of Herr Gerhard Eicke.
Mr....Dynes affords himself a smile and awaits Fleurís response.
FLEUR
I do not deny knowing Herr Eicke. He was my sonís Youth leader.
MR. DYNES
Come, come, Frau Richter. Herr Eicke is not a Youth leader. Heís a senior Gestapo man in Hamburg and you know that!
FLEUR
Yes I do. I tell you I do not deny knowing him but to say I work for him would be outrageous.
MR. DYNES
Your son Otto. He must put you in a difficult position.
FLEUR
You are extremely well informed.
MR. DYNES
Our Consul in Hamburg is a busy man. But Otto, Frau Richter...
FLEUR
If he had been much younger I would have brought him home with me, perhaps I should have done so shortly after my husband died. But he is nineteen now. A man making his own way in life.
MR. DYNES
Indeed, making his own way in life. Choosing to serve the SS in the Hamburg motorized unit, I believe.
A tear wells up in Fleurís eyes. She takes her handkerchief from her sleeve. She wipes her eyes.
FLEUR
And I thought this was a new start to my life. Perhaps teaching in the local school. Returning to my roots. The only difficulty I foresaw was my name. Yet I am proud to have that name. Dr. Willy Richter was a fine man, a peace loving doctor.
Mr.... Dynes sits back in his chair, lights a cigarette and offers one to Fleur who shakes her head. He then offers one to Mr... Shadbolt who accepts and lights up.
MR. DYNES
So, how did you get mixed up with Herr Eicke?
FLEUR
He came to Willyís funeral. Perhaps then it was when he recognized my value as an alien in his midst. I shunned him at first, as did my sister and brother in law.
MR. DYNES
Karl and Renate?
Fleur looks up at Mr.... Dynes.
FLEUR
You know them too? You are thorough.
MR. Dynes nods.
FLEUR (CONTíD)
I did not see much of him after that. I heard about him through Otto but it was only when I was preparing to leave Germany that Herr Eicke took more interest in me, once more.
Fleur lifts her oboe case on to her lap. She lays her hand on the box and gently caresses it.
FLEUR (CONTíD)
He told me that there were German agents in Britain. Even in the north by Lossiemouth and Fort St George. That shook me. Then he said I could act as a resource for them, you know a confidant, someone to keep their spirits up.
MR. DYNES
Did he give you their names?
FLEUR
No. He said they would contact me.
MR. DYNES
So Eicke knows you will be staying at Forres?
FLEUR
Yes, Otto told him who his next of kin were and so he found out I was returning home. That was my fault, my weakness, I suppose.
MR. DYNES
Why?
Fleur smiles.
FLEUR
Herr Eicke is using Karl and Renateís weakness in support of Hitler, to frighten me. Itís funny though. Eicke threatens me because I might be a suspect German and you interrogate me because Iím suspected to be a fervent German. I think you and Herr Eicke should sit down and sort this whole thing out!
Mr....Dynes Stands up and sits on the side of the table.
MR. DYNES
I like your humour. Maybe I might meet Herr Eicke one day.
FLEUR
Look, you can search my bags if you wish. I assure you that you will not find any papers from Herr Eicke. I have no address for him although he promised to contact me. I have no equipment which could possibly make you think I was a spy.
MR. DYNES
We have already checked your goods in the hold of the Grampian Empress...and found nothing incriminating.
FLEUR
 I am not surprised. Go on check my hand luggage. Be thorough! I have nothing to hide. 
Mr.... Shadbolt opens her luggage and looks into her bag. He turns to Mr... Dynes and shakes his head. Mr... Dynes points his stare to her oboe case. Mr.... Shadbolt takes it from her lap. He opens it and peers through each of the three pieces of the instrument. He then feels the lining for any enclosures. He tears the lining of the oboe case. After a thorough search, he shakes his head towards Mr... Dynes.
MR. DYNES
Mr.... Shadbolt, I think this is one for MI6 donít you?
Mr.... Anthony Shadbolt sits at the desk to address Fleur.
MR. SHADBOLT
Frau Richter. Your late father. He spent some time in the Gold Coast in Africa didnít he?
Fleur looks startled.
FLEUR
Why yes. But that was some time ago.
MR. SHADBOLT
Captain James Bruce. Kumasi Garrison. 1896-1902.
FLEUR
Yes, the Ashanti wars. I am impressed with your knowledge of my family but this is quite disconcerting. Whatever next?
MR. SHADBOLT
How would you like the opportunity to follow your fatherís footsteps and work for us in the Gold Coast?
Fleur is puzzled.
FLEUR
Are you serious? I really canít understand whatís happening. First I am arrested. I then tell you about Herr Eicke and his interest in me. Now you offer me a job in Africa! Itís very confusing.
Mr.... Dynes opens the black oboe box. He finds the oboe packed away in three parts. He looks through each part, then hands the instrument parts over to Fleur.
MR. DYNES
I think if you played this a little, I would be satisfied that the oboe is just what it is.
Fleur assembles the oboe, and dampens the double reed. She thinks for a moment about what to play. Then she plays the tune ĎOver The Seas To Skyeí.
MR. DYNES (CONTíD)
Delightful. And somewhat appropriate too. Mr... Shadbolt, sorry, I interrupted you.
Fleur lays the oboe on its closed box.
MR. SHADBOLT
Yes Africa. The Dark Continent. Opened up my missionaries and traders. Itís the missionaries we are interested in.
FLEUR
I canít see what use Iíd be to missionaries.
MR. SHADBOLT
Oh I think you could sort the wheat from the sheaves.
FLEUR
Could you be less vague and tell me what you have on your mind?
MR. SHADBOLT
The Missionaries Frau Richter. In the Gold Coast, they are the Basel Missionaries. Presbyterian Swiss but not all. Some come from Germany.
He stubs out his cigarette.
MR. SHADBOLT (CONTíD)
 Our difficulty is in understanding if we have a hostile presence in a Colony. We need a person who is neither wholly British nor wholly German.
FLEUR
So itís not just about recognizing a clerical collar, an accent and then repatriation?
MR. SHADBOLT
No. Some Swiss missionaries may or may not sympathise with Hitler. Others are German.  And not all the  Missionaries are ordained.
Fleur stands up.
FLEUR
Really? So what do the others do?
MR. SHADBOLT
Some are teachers, doctors and agriculturalists. We are concerned about the propaganda they might be spreading.
FLEUR
I see. Itís all making some sense to me now. You are looking for a fluent German speaker but whose loyalty to Britain is unquestionable.
MR. SHADBOLT
Exactly.
FLEUR
Ummmm. Thatís my problem. But thatís the risk you take.... with a double agent. Isnít it Mr.... Shadbolt?
Mr... Shadbolt goes over to the oboe case and lifts up the instrument. He turns to Fleur holding it pretending to play it with his fingers dancing over the note holes.
MR. SHADBOLT
Itís how you play it, Frau Richter,..... how you play it.

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