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By Doug Holder   
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Last edited: Sunday, May 01, 2011
Posted: Sunday, May 01, 2011

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The Bagel Bards are a loose group of local writers, many of them
poets, who meet once a week at the welcoming coffee shop Au Bon Pain in Davis Square, Somerville, Massachusetts to share coffee and bagels.But most importantly, they share information about the writing trade. They are a networking group for writers in the area.
The brain child of at least four superb and conscientious writers,
Doug Holder, Harris Gardner, Steve Glines and Irene Koronos, the
Bagel Bards have been meeting weekly for years, providing a haven
for local writers and publishers engaged in the solitary practice of the
wordsmith profession. Writing and reading are the shared passions.
Bagel Bards range in age from 19 to 94-plus.

 


The Bards exist to share fellowship and information. Here is where
you learn who is publishing or has just published what. Who is looking
for a job? Who is offering one? Who is teaching or putting on a performance? Who is starting a press? How do you lay out a Web site? What’s great to read right now? What magazines are looking for work?
Luckily, this is not a place to parade one’s ego or one’s poems,
or even to workshop poems. The Bagel Bards are discreet, respectful
and—how rare!—non-hierarchical. They offer the local writer, whether
young or advanced, academic or not, a non-competitive and welcoming
community. It’s all about sharing information on writing and publishing.
New independent presses have arisen from the Bagel Bards—there
are at least four at this count as well as many journals. There are other
creative spin-offs, too. The Bagel Bards and its affiliates put out weekly
newsletters and news of the Boston small press scene. There are interviews on cable TV, online and print mags, Web design, etc. In our
community, The Grolier Poetry Bookshop is a touchstone and the
Bagel Bards is our local networking group, supportive and welcoming,
Writing from the Bagel Bards membership is widely published.
We celebrate each triumph among us and encourage each other. New
reading series have been created as well as many other opportunities for writers both young and old to be heard. This  anthology, guest-edited
by prize-winning poet and former Houghton Mifflin editor Lawrence
Kessenich, is an example of work by the Bards.


Perhaps other communities of writers might want to create the
equivalent in their own locales: drop-in, open, easy, non-hierarchical,
generous, and helpful to all who write.
Meanwhile, dear writers and readers, welcome to these pages.
Thank you for taking a look.

The Bagel Bards are a loose group of local writers, many of them
poets, who meet once a week at the welcoming coffee shop Au Bon Pain
in Davis Square, Somerville, Massachusetts to share coffee and bagels.
But most importantly, they share information about the writing trade.
They are a networking group for writers in the area.
The brain child of at least four superb and conscientious writers,
Doug Holder, Harris Gardner, Steve Glines and Irene Koronos, the
Bagel Bards have been meeting weekly for years, providing a haven
for local writers and publishers engaged in the solitary practice of the
wordsmith profession. Writing and reading are the shared passions.
Bagel Bards range in age from 19 to 94-plus.
The Bards exist to share fellowship and information. Here is where
you learn who is publishing or has just published what. Who is looking
for a job? Who is offering one? Who is teaching or putting on a performance?
Who is starting a press? How do you lay out a Web site? What’s
great to read right now? What magazines are looking for work?
Luckily, this is not a place to parade one’s ego or one’s poems,
or even to workshop poems. The Bagel Bards are discreet, respectful
and—how rare!—non-hierarchical. They offer the local writer, whether
young or advanced, academic or not, a non-competitive and welcoming
community. It’s all about sharing information on writing and publishing.
New independent presses have arisen from the Bagel Bards—there
are at least four at this count as well as many journals. There are other
creative spin-offs, too. The Bagel Bards and its affiliates put out weekly
newsletters and news of the Boston small press scene. There are interviews
on cable TV, online and print mags, Web design, etc. In our
community, The Grolier Poetry Bookshop is a touchstone and the
Bagel Bards is our local networking group, supportive and welcoming,
Writing from the Bagel Bards membership is widely published.
We celebrate each triumph among us and encourage each other. New
reading series have been created as well as many other opportunities for
writers both young and old to be heard. This magazine, guest-edited
by prize-winning poet and former Houghton Mifflin editor Lawrence
Kessenich, is an example of work by the Bards.
Perhaps other communities of writers might want to create the
equivalent in their own locales: drop-in, open, easy, non-hierarchical,
generous, and helpful to all who write.
Meanwhile, dear writers and readers, welcome to these pages.
Thank you for taking a look.

The Bagel Bards are a loose group of local writers, many of them
poets, who meet once a week at the welcoming coffee shop Au Bon Pain
in Davis Square, Somerville, Massachusetts to share coffee and bagels.
But most importantly, they share information about the writing trade.
They are a networking group for writers in the area.
The brain child of at least four superb and conscientious writers,
Doug Holder, Harris Gardner, Steve Glines and Irene Koronos, the
Bagel Bards have been meeting weekly for years, providing a haven
for local writers and publishers engaged in the solitary practice of the
wordsmith profession. Writing and reading are the shared passions.
Bagel Bards range in age from 19 to 94-plus.
The Bards exist to share fellowship and information. Here is where
you learn who is publishing or has just published what. Who is looking
for a job? Who is offering one? Who is teaching or putting on a performance?
Who is starting a press? How do you lay out a Web site? What’s
great to read right now? What magazines are looking for work?
Luckily, this is not a place to parade one’s ego or one’s poems,
or even to workshop poems. The Bagel Bards are discreet, respectful
and—how rare!—non-hierarchical. They offer the local writer, whether
young or advanced, academic or not, a non-competitive and welcoming
community. It’s all about sharing information on writing and publishing.
New independent presses have arisen from the Bagel Bards—there
are at least four at this count as well as many journals. There are other
creative spin-offs, too. The Bagel Bards and its affiliates put out weekly
newsletters and news of the Boston small press scene. There are interviews
on cable TV, online and print mags, Web design, etc. In our
community, The Grolier Poetry Bookshop is a touchstone and the
Bagel Bards is our local networking group, supportive and welcoming,
Writing from the Bagel Bards membership is widely published.
We celebrate each triumph among us and encourage each other. New
reading series have been created as well as many other opportunities for
writers both young and old to be heard. This magazine, guest-edited
by prize-winning poet and former Houghton Mifflin editor Lawrence
Kessenich, is an example of work by the Bards.
Perhaps other communities of writers might want to create the
equivalent in their own locales: drop-in, open, easy, non-hierarchical,
generous, and helpful to all who write.
Meanwhile, dear writers and readers, welcome to these pages.
Thank you for taking a look.

The Bagel Bards are a loose group of local writers, many of them
poets, who meet once a week at the welcoming coffee shop Au Bon Pain
in Davis Square, Somerville, Massachusetts to share coffee and bagels.
But most importantly, they share information about the writing trade.
They are a networking group for writers in the area.
The brain child of at least four superb and conscientious writers,
Doug Holder, Harris Gardner, Steve Glines and Irene Koronos, the
Bagel Bards have been meeting weekly for years, providing a haven
for local writers and publishers engaged in the solitary practice of the
wordsmith profession. Writing and reading are the shared passions.
Bagel Bards range in age from 19 to 94-plus.
The Bards exist to share fellowship and information. Here is where
you learn who is publishing or has just published what. Who is looking
for a job? Who is offering one? Who is teaching or putting on a performance?
Who is starting a press? How do you lay out a Web site? What’s
great to read right now? What magazines are looking for work?
Luckily, this is not a place to parade one’s ego or one’s poems,
or even to workshop poems. The Bagel Bards are discreet, respectful
and—how rare!—non-hierarchical. They offer the local writer, whether
young or advanced, academic or not, a non-competitive and welcoming
community. It’s all about sharing information on writing and publishing.
New independent presses have arisen from the Bagel Bards—there
are at least four at this count as well as many journals. There are other
creative spin-offs, too. The Bagel Bards and its affiliates put out weekly
newsletters and news of the Boston small press scene. There are interviews
on cable TV, online and print mags, Web design, etc. In our
community, The Grolier Poetry Bookshop is a touchstone and the
Bagel Bards is our local networking group, supportive and welcoming,
Writing from the Bagel Bards membership is widely published.
We celebrate each triumph among us and encourage each other. New
reading series have been created as well as many other opportunities for
writers both young and old to be heard. This magazine, guest-edited
by prize-winning poet and former Houghton Mifflin editor Lawrence
Kessenich, is an example of work by the Bards.
Perhaps other communities of writers might want to create the
equivalent in their own locales: drop-in, open, easy, non-hierarchical,
generous, and helpful to all who write.
Meanwhile, dear writers and readers, welcome to these pages.
Thank you for taking a look.

The Bagel Bards are a loose group of local writers, many of them
poets, who meet once a week at the welcoming coffee shop Au Bon Pain
in Davis Square, Somerville, Massachusetts to share coffee and bagels.
But most importantly, they share information about the writing trade.
They are a networking group for writers in the area.
The brain child of at least four superb and conscientious writers,
Doug Holder, Harris Gardner, Steve Glines and Irene Koronos, the
Bagel Bards have been meeting weekly for years, providing a haven
for local writers and publishers engaged in the solitary practice of the
wordsmith profession. Writing and reading are the shared passions.
Bagel Bards range in age from 19 to 94-plus.
The Bards exist to share fellowship and information. Here is where
you learn who is publishing or has just published what. Who is looking
for a job? Who is offering one? Who is teaching or putting on a performance?
Who is starting a press? How do you lay out a Web site? What’s
great to read right now? What magazines are looking for work?
Luckily, this is not a place to parade one’s ego or one’s poems,
or even to workshop poems. The Bagel Bards are discreet, respectful
and—how rare!—non-hierarchical. They offer the local writer, whether
young or advanced, academic or not, a non-competitive and welcoming
community. It’s all about sharing information on writing and publishing.
New independent presses have arisen from the Bagel Bards—there
are at least four at this count as well as many journals. There are other
creative spin-offs, too. The Bagel Bards and its affiliates put out weekly
newsletters and news of the Boston small press scene. There are interviews
on cable TV, online and print mags, Web design, etc. In our
community, The Grolier Poetry Bookshop is a touchstone and the
Bagel Bards is our local networking group, supportive and welcoming,
Writing from the Bagel Bards membership is widely published.
We celebrate each triumph among us and encourage each other. New
reading series have been created as well as many other opportunities for
writers both young and old to be heard. This magazine, guest-edited
by prize-winning poet and former Houghton Mifflin editor Lawrence
Kessenich, is an example of work by the Bards.
Perhaps other communities of writers might want to create the
equivalent in their own locales: drop-in, open, easy, non-hierarchical,
generous, and helpful to all who write.
Meanwhile, dear writers and readers, welcome to these pages.
Thank you for taking a look.

The Bagel Bards are a loose group of local writers, many of them
poets, who meet once a week at the welcoming coffee shop Au Bon Pain
in Davis Square, Somerville, Massachusetts to share coffee and bagels.
But most importantly, they share information about the writing trade.
They are a networking group for writers in the area.
The brain child of at least four superb and conscientious writers,
Doug Holder, Harris Gardner, Steve Glines and Irene Koronos, the
Bagel Bards have been meeting weekly for years, providing a haven
for local writers and publishers engaged in the solitary practice of the
wordsmith profession. Writing and reading are the shared passions.
Bagel Bards range in age from 19 to 94-plus.
The Bards exist to share fellowship and information. Here is where
you learn who is publishing or has just published what. Who is looking
for a job? Who is offering one? Who is teaching or putting on a performance?
Who is starting a press? How do you lay out a Web site? What’s
great to read right now? What magazines are looking for work?
Luckily, this is not a place to parade one’s ego or one’s poems,
or even to workshop poems. The Bagel Bards are discreet, respectful
and—how rare!—non-hierarchical. They offer the local writer, whether
young or advanced, academic or not, a non-competitive and welcoming
community. It’s all about sharing information on writing and publishing.
New independent presses have arisen from the Bagel Bards—there
are at least four at this count as well as many journals. There are other
creative spin-offs, too. The Bagel Bards and its affiliates put out weekly
newsletters and news of the Boston small press scene. There are interviews
on cable TV, online and print mags, Web design, etc. In our
community, The Grolier Poetry Bookshop is a touchstone and the
Bagel Bards is our local networking group, supportive and welcoming,
Writing from the Bagel Bards membership is widely published.
We celebrate each triumph among us and encourage each other. New
reading series have been created as well as many other opportunities for
writers both young and old to be heard. This magazine, guest-edited
by prize-winning poet and former Houghton Mifflin editor Lawrence
Kessenich, is an example of work by the Bards.
Perhaps other communities of writers might want to create the
equivalent in their own locales: drop-in, open, easy, non-hierarchical,
generous, and helpful to all who write.
Meanwhile, dear writers and readers, welcome to these pages.
Thank you for taking a look.

The Bagel Bards are a loose group of local writers, many of them
poets, who meet once a week at the welcoming coffee shop Au Bon Pain
in Davis Square, Somerville, Massachusetts to share coffee and bagels.
But most importantly, they share information about the writing trade.
They are a networking group for writers in the area.
The brain child of at least four superb and conscientious writers,
Doug Holder, Harris Gardner, Steve Glines and Irene Koronos, the
Bagel Bards have been meeting weekly for years, providing a haven
for local writers and publishers engaged in the solitary practice of the
wordsmith profession. Writing and reading are the shared passions.
Bagel Bards range in age from 19 to 94-plus.
The Bards exist to share fellowship and information. Here is where
you learn who is publishing or has just published what. Who is looking
for a job? Who is offering one? Who is teaching or putting on a performance?
Who is starting a press? How do you lay out a Web site? What’s
great to read right now? What magazines are looking for work?
Luckily, this is not a place to parade one’s ego or one’s poems,
or even to workshop poems. The Bagel Bards are discreet, respectful
and—how rare!—non-hierarchical. They offer the local writer, whether
young or advanced, academic or not, a non-competitive and welcoming
community. It’s all about sharing information on writing and publishing.
New independent presses have arisen from the Bagel Bards—there
are at least four at this count as well as many journals. There are other
creative spin-offs, too. The Bagel Bards and its affiliates put out weekly
newsletters and news of the Boston small press scene. There are interviews
on cable TV, online and print mags, Web design, etc. In our
community, The Grolier Poetry Bookshop is a touchstone and the
Bagel Bards is our local networking group, supportive and welcoming,
Writing from the Bagel Bards membership is widely published.
We celebrate each triumph among us and encourage each other. New
reading series have been created as well as many other opportunities for
writers both young and old to be heard. This magazine, guest-edited
by prize-winning poet and former Houghton Mifflin editor Lawrence
Kessenich, is an example of work by the Bards.
Perhaps other communities of writers might want to create the
equivalent in their own locales: drop-in, open, easy, non-hierarchical,
generous, and helpful to all who write.
Meanwhile, dear writers and readers, welcome to these pages.
Thank you for taking a look.

The Bagel Bards are a loose group of local writers, many of them
poets, who meet once a week at the welcoming coffee shop Au Bon Pain
in Davis Square, Somerville, Massachusetts to share coffee and bagels.
But most importantly, they share information about the writing trade.
They are a networking group for writers in the area.
The brain child of at least four superb and conscientious writers,
Doug Holder, Harris Gardner, Steve Glines and Irene Koronos, the
Bagel Bards have been meeting weekly for years, providing a haven
for local writers and publishers engaged in the solitary practice of the
wordsmith profession. Writing and reading are the shared passions.
Bagel Bards range in age from 19 to 94-plus.
The Bards exist to share fellowship and information. Here is where
you learn who is publishing or has just published what. Who is looking
for a job? Who is offering one? Who is teaching or putting on a performance?
Who is starting a press? How do you lay out a Web site? What’s
great to read right now? What magazines are looking for work?
Luckily, this is not a place to parade one’s ego or one’s poems,
or even to workshop poems. The Bagel Bards are discreet, respectful
and—how rare!—non-hierarchical. They offer the local writer, whether
young or advanced, academic or not, a non-competitive and welcoming
community. It’s all about sharing information on writing and publishing.
New independent presses have arisen from the Bagel Bards—there
are at least four at this count as well as many journals. There are other
creative spin-offs, too. The Bagel Bards and its affiliates put out weekly
newsletters and news of the Boston small press scene. There are interviews
on cable TV, online and print mags, Web design, etc. In our
community, The Grolier Poetry Bookshop is a touchstone and the
Bagel Bards is our local networking group, supportive and welcoming,
Writing from the Bagel Bards membership is widely published.
We celebrate each triumph among us and encourage each other. New
reading series have been created as well as many other opportunities for
writers both young and old to be heard. This magazine, guest-edited
by prize-winning poet and former Houghton Mifflin editor Lawrence
Kessenich, is an example of work by the Bards.
Perhaps other communities of writers might want to create the
equivalent in their own locales: drop-in, open, easy, non-hierarchical,
generous, and helpful to all who write.
Meanwhile, dear writers and readers, welcome to these pages.
Thank you for taking a look.

The Bagel Bards are a loose group of local writers, many of them
poets, who meet once a week at the welcoming coffee shop Au Bon Pain
in Davis Square, Somerville, Massachusetts to share coffee and bagels.
But most importantly, they share information about the writing trade.
They are a networking group for writers in the area.
The brain child of at least four superb and conscientious writers,
Doug Holder, Harris Gardner, Steve Glines and Irene Koronos, the
Bagel Bards have been meeting weekly for years, providing a haven
for local writers and publishers engaged in the solitary practice of the
wordsmith profession. Writing and reading are the shared passions.
Bagel Bards range in age from 19 to 94-plus.
The Bards exist to share fellowship and information. Here is where
you learn who is publishing or has just published what. Who is looking
for a job? Who is offering one? Who is teaching or putting on a performance?
Who is starting a press? How do you lay out a Web site? What’s
great to read right now? What magazines are looking for work?
Luckily, this is not a place to parade one’s ego or one’s poems,
or even to workshop poems. The Bagel Bards are discreet, respectful
and—how rare!—non-hierarchical. They offer the local writer, whether
young or advanced, academic or not, a non-competitive and welcoming
community. It’s all about sharing information on writing and publishing.
New independent presses have arisen from the Bagel Bards—there
are at least four at this count as well as many journals. There are other
creative spin-offs, too. The Bagel Bards and its affiliates put out weekly
newsletters and news of the Boston small press scene. There are interviews
on cable TV, online and print mags, Web design, etc. In our
community, The Grolier Poetry Bookshop is a touchstone and the
Bagel Bards is our local networking group, supportive and welcoming,
Writing from the Bagel Bards membership is widely published.
We celebrate each triumph among us and encourage each other. New
reading series have been created as well as many other opportunities for
writers both young and old to be heard. This magazine, guest-edited
by prize-winning poet and former Houghton Mifflin editor Lawrence
Kessenich, is an example of work by the Bards.
Perhaps other communities of writers might want to create the
equivalent in their own locales: drop-in, open, easy, non-hierarchical,
generous, and helpful to all who write.
Meanwhile, dear writers and readers, welcome to these pages.
Thank you for taking a look.

The Bagel Bards are a loose group of local writers, many of them
poets, who meet once a week at the welcoming coffee shop Au Bon Pain
in Davis Square, Somerville, Massachusetts to share coffee and bagels.
But most importantly, they share information about the writing trade.
They are a networking group for writers in the area.
The brain child of at least four superb and conscientious writers,
Doug Holder, Harris Gardner, Steve Glines and Irene Koronos, the
Bagel Bards have been meeting weekly for years, providing a haven
for local writers and publishers engaged in the solitary practice of the
wordsmith profession. Writing and reading are the shared passions.
Bagel Bards range in age from 19 to 94-plus.
The Bards exist to share fellowship and information. Here is where
you learn who is publishing or has just published what. Who is looking
for a job? Who is offering one? Who is teaching or putting on a performance?
Who is starting a press? How do you lay out a Web site? What’s
great to read right now? What magazines are looking for work?
Luckily, this is not a place to parade one’s ego or one’s poems,
or even to workshop poems. The Bagel Bards are discreet, respectful
and—how rare!—non-hierarchical. They offer the local writer, whether
young or advanced, academic or not, a non-competitive and welcoming
community. It’s all about sharing information on writing and publishing.
New independent presses have arisen from the Bagel Bards—there
are at least four at this count as well as many journals. There are other
creative spin-offs, too. The Bagel Bards and its affiliates put out weekly
newsletters and news of the Boston small press scene. There are interviews
on cable TV, online and print mags, Web design, etc. In our
community, The Grolier Poetry Bookshop is a touchstone and the
Bagel Bards is our local networking group, supportive and welcoming,
Writing from the Bagel Bards membership is widely published.
We celebrate each triumph among us and encourage each other. New
reading series have been created as well as many other opportunities for
writers both young and old to be heard. This magazine, guest-edited
by prize-winning poet and former Houghton Mifflin editor Lawrence
Kessenich, is an example of work by the Bards.
Perhaps other communities of writers might want to create the
equivalent in their own locales: drop-in, open, easy, non-hierarchical,
generous, and helpful to all who write.
Meanwhile, dear writers and readers, welcome to these pages.
Thank you for taking a look.

The Bagel Bards are a loose group of local writers, many of them
poets, who meet once a week at the welcoming coffee shop Au Bon Pain
in Davis Square, Somerville, Massachusetts to share coffee and bagels.
But most importantly, they share information about the writing trade.
They are a networking group for writers in the area.
The brain child of at least four superb and conscientious writers,
Doug Holder, Harris Gardner, Steve Glines and Irene Koronos, the
Bagel Bards have been meeting weekly for years, providing a haven
for local writers and publishers engaged in the solitary practice of the
wordsmith profession. Writing and reading are the shared passions.
Bagel Bards range in age from 19 to 94-plus.
The Bards exist to share fellowship and information. Here is where
you learn who is publishing or has just published what. Who is looking
for a job? Who is offering one? Who is teaching or putting on a performance?
Who is starting a press? How do you lay out a Web site? What’s
great to read right now? What magazines are looking for work?
Luckily, this is not a place to parade one’s ego or one’s poems,
or even to workshop poems. The Bagel Bards are discreet, respectful
and—how rare!—non-hierarchical. They offer the local writer, whether
young or advanced, academic or not, a non-competitive and welcoming
community. It’s all about sharing information on writing and publishing.
New independent presses have arisen from the Bagel Bards—there
are at least four at this count as well as many journals. There are other
creative spin-offs, too. The Bagel Bards and its affiliates put out weekly
newsletters and news of the Boston small press scene. There are interviews
on cable TV, online and print mags, Web design, etc. In our
community, The Grolier Poetry Bookshop is a touchstone and the
Bagel Bards is our local networking group, supportive and welcoming,
Writing from the Bagel Bards membership is widely published.
We celebrate each triumph among us and encourage each other. New
reading series have been created as well as many other opportunities for
writers both young and old to be heard. This magazine, guest-edited
by prize-winning poet and former Houghton Mifflin editor Lawrence
Kessenich, is an example of work by the Bards.
Perhaps other communities of writers might want to create the
equivalent in their own locales: drop-in, open, easy, non-hierarchical,
generous, and helpful to all who write.
Meanwhile, dear writers and readers, welcome to these pages.
Thank you for taking a look.

The Bagel Bards are a loose group of local writers, many of them
poets, who meet once a week at the welcoming coffee shop Au Bon Pain
in Davis Square, Somerville, Massachusetts to share coffee and bagels.
But most importantly, they share information about the writing trade.
They are a networking group for writers in the area.
The brain child of at least four superb and conscientious writers,
Doug Holder, Harris Gardner, Steve Glines and Irene Koronos, the
Bagel Bards have been meeting weekly for years, providing a haven
for local writers and publishers engaged in the solitary practice of the
wordsmith profession. Writing and reading are the shared passions.
Bagel Bards range in age from 19 to 94-plus.
The Bards exist to share fellowship and information. Here is where
you learn who is publishing or has just published what. Who is looking
for a job? Who is offering one? Who is teaching or putting on a performance?
Who is starting a press? How do you lay out a Web site? What’s
great to read right now? What magazines are looking for work?
Luckily, this is not a place to parade one’s ego or one’s poems,
or even to workshop poems. The Bagel Bards are discreet, respectful
and—how rare!—non-hierarchical. They offer the local writer, whether
young or advanced, academic or not, a non-competitive and welcoming
community. It’s all about sharing information on writing and publishing.
New independent presses have arisen from the Bagel Bards—there
are at least four at this count as well as many journals. There are other
creative spin-offs, too. The Bagel Bards and its affiliates put out weekly
newsletters and news of the Boston small press scene. There are interviews
on cable TV, online and print mags, Web design, etc. In our
community, The Grolier Poetry Bookshop is a touchstone and the
Bagel Bards is our local networking group, supportive and welcoming,
Writing from the Bagel Bards membership is widely published.
We celebrate each triumph among us and encourage each other. New
reading series have been created as well as many other opportunities for
writers both young and old to be heard. This magazine, guest-edited
by prize-winning poet and former Houghton Mifflin editor Lawrence
Kessenich, is an example of work by the Bards.
Perhaps other communities of writers might want to create the
equivalent in their own locales: drop-in, open, easy, non-hierarchical,
generous, and helpful to all who write.
Meanwhile, dear writers and readers, welcome to these pages.
Thank you for taking a look.

The Bagel Bards are a loose group of local writers, many of them
poets, who meet once a week at the welcoming coffee shop Au Bon Pain
in Davis Square, Somerville, Massachusetts to share coffee and bagels.
But most importantly, they share information about the writing trade.
They are a networking group for writers in the area.
The brain child of at least four superb and conscientious writers,
Doug Holder, Harris Gardner, Steve Glines and Irene Koronos, the
Bagel Bards have been meeting weekly for years, providing a haven
for local writers and publishers engaged in the solitary practice of the
wordsmith profession. Writing and reading are the shared passions.
Bagel Bards range in age from 19 to 94-plus.
The Bards exist to share fellowship and information. Here is where
you learn who is publishing or has just published what. Who is looking
for a job? Who is offering one? Who is teaching or putting on a performance?
Who is starting a press? How do you lay out a Web site? What’s
great to read right now? What magazines are looking for work?
Luckily, this is not a place to parade one’s ego or one’s poems,
or even to workshop poems. The Bagel Bards are discreet, respectful
and—how rare!—non-hierarchical. They offer the local writer, whether
young or advanced, academic or not, a non-competitive and welcoming
community. It’s all about sharing information on writing and publishing.
New independent presses have arisen from the Bagel Bards—there
are at least four at this count as well as many journals. There are other
creative spin-offs, too. The Bagel Bards and its affiliates put out weekly
newsletters and news of the Boston small press scene. There are interviews
on cable TV, online and print mags, Web design, etc. In our
community, The Grolier Poetry Bookshop is a touchstone and the
Bagel Bards is our local networking group, supportive and welcoming,
Writing from the Bagel Bards membership is widely published.
We celebrate each triumph among us and encourage each other. New
reading series have been created as well as many other opportunities for
writers both young and old to be heard. This magazine, guest-edited
by prize-winning poet and former Houghton Mifflin editor Lawrence
Kessenich, is an example of work by the Bards.
Perhaps other communities of writers might want to create the
equivalent in their own locales: drop-in, open, easy, non-hierarchical,
generous, and helpful to all who write.
Meanwhile, dear writers and readers, welcome to these pages.
Thank you for taking a look.

The Bagel Bards are a loose group of local writers, many of them
poets, who meet once a week at the welcoming coffee shop Au Bon Pain
in Davis Square, Somerville, Massachusetts to share coffee and bagels.
But most importantly, they share information about the writing trade.
They are a networking group for writers in the area.
The brain child of at least four superb and conscientious writers,
Doug Holder, Harris Gardner, Steve Glines and Irene Koronos, the
Bagel Bards have been meeting weekly for years, providing a haven
for local writers and publishers engaged in the solitary practice of the
wordsmith profession. Writing and reading are the shared passions.
Bagel Bards range in age from 19 to 94-plus.


The Bards exist to share fellowship and information. Here is where
you learn who is publishing or has just published what. Who is looking
for a job? Who is offering one? Who is teaching or putting on a performance?
Who is starting a press? How do you lay out a Web site? What’s
great to read right now? What magazines are looking for work?
Luckily, this is not a place to parade one’s ego or one’s poems,
or even to workshop poems. The Bagel Bards are discreet, respectful
and—how rare!—non-hierarchical. They offer the local writer, whether
young or advanced, academic or not, a non-competitive and welcoming
community. It’s all about sharing information on writing and publishing.
New independent presses have arisen from the Bagel Bards—there
are at least four at this count as well as many journals. There are other
creative spin-offs, too. The Bagel Bards and its affiliates put out weekly
newsletters and news of the Boston small press scene. There are interviews
on cable TV, online and print mags, Web design, etc. In our
community, The Grolier Poetry Bookshop is a touchstone and the
Bagel Bards is our local networking group, supportive and welcoming,
Writing from the Bagel Bards membership is widely published.
We celebrate each triumph among us and encourage each other. New
reading series have been created as well as many other opportunities for
writers both young and old to be heard. This magazine, guest-edited
by prize-winning poet and former Houghton Mifflin editor Lawrence
Kessenich, is an example of work by the Bards.
Perhaps other communities of writers might want to create the
equivalent in their own locales: drop-in, open, easy, non-hierarchical,
generous, and helpful to all who write.
Meanwhile, dear writers and readers, welcome to these pages.
Thank you for taking a look.

The Bagel Bards are a loose group of local writers, many of them
poets, who meet once a week at the welcoming coffee shop Au Bon Pain
in Davis Square, Somerville, Massachusetts to share coffee and bagels.
But most importantly, they share information about the writing trade.
They are a networking group for writers in the area.
The brain child of at least four superb and conscientious writers,
Doug Holder, Harris Gardner, Steve Glines and Irene Koronos, the
Bagel Bards have been meeting weekly for years, providing a haven
for local writers and publishers engaged in the solitary practice of the
wordsmith profession. Writing and reading are the shared passions.
Bagel Bards range in age from 19 to 94-plus.
The Bards exist to share fellowship and information. Here is where
you learn who is publishing or has just published what. Who is looking
for a job? Who is offering one? Who is teaching or putting on a performance?
Who is starting a press? How do you lay out a Web site? What’s
great to read right now? What magazines are looking for work?
Luckily, this is not a place to parade one’s ego or one’s poems,
or even to workshop poems. The Bagel Bards are discreet, respectful
and—how rare!—non-hierarchical. They offer the local writer, whether
young or advanced, academic or not, a non-competitive and welcoming
community. It’s all about sharing information on writing and publishing.
New independent presses have arisen from the Bagel Bards—there
are at least four at this count as well as many journals. There are other
creative spin-offs, too. The Bagel Bards and its affiliates put out weekly
newsletters and news of the Boston small press scene. There are interviews
on cable TV, online and print mags, Web design, etc. In our
community, The Grolier Poetry Bookshop is a touchstone and the
Bagel Bards is our local networking group, supportive and welcoming,
Writing from the Bagel Bards membership is widely published.
We celebrate each triumph among us and encourage each other. New
reading series have been created as well as many other opportunities for
writers both young and old to be heard. This magazine, guest-edited
by prize-winning poet and former Houghton Mifflin editor Lawrence
Kessenich, is an example of work by the Bards.
Perhaps other communities of writers might want to create the
equivalent in their own locales: drop-in, open, easy, non-hierarchical,
generous, and helpful to all who write.
Meanwhile, dear writers and readers, welcome to these pages.
Thank you for taking a look.

The Bagel Bards are a loose group of local writers, many of them
poets, who meet once a week at the welcoming coffee shop Au Bon Pain
in Davis Square, Somerville, Massachusetts to share coffee and bagels.
But most importantly, they share information about the writing trade.
They are a networking group for writers in the area.
The brain child of at least four superb and conscientious writers,
Doug Holder, Harris Gardner, Steve Glines and Irene Koronos, the
Bagel Bards have been meeting weekly for years, providing a haven
for local writers and publishers engaged in the solitary practice of the
wordsmith profession. Writing and reading are the shared passions.
Bagel Bards range in age from 19 to 94-plus.
The Bards exist to share fellowship and information. Here is where
you learn who is publishing or has just published what. Who is looking
for a job? Who is offering one? Who is teaching or putting on a performance?
Who is starting a press? How do you lay out a Web site? What’s
great to read right now? What magazines are looking for work?
Luckily, this is not a place to parade one’s ego or one’s poems,
or even to workshop poems. The Bagel Bards are discreet, respectful
and—how rare!—non-hierarchical. They offer the local writer, whether
young or advanced, academic or not, a non-competitive and welcoming
community. It’s all about sharing information on writing and publishing.
New independent presses have arisen from the Bagel Bards—there
are at least four at this count as well as many journals. There are other
creative spin-offs, too. The Bagel Bards and its affiliates put out weekly
newsletters and news of the Boston small press scene. There are interviews
on cable TV, online and print mags, Web design, etc. In our
community, The Grolier Poetry Bookshop is a touchstone and the
Bagel Bards is our local networking group, supportive and welcoming,
Writing from the Bagel Bards membership is widely published.
We celebrate each triumph among us and encourage each other. New
reading series have been created as well as many other opportunities for
writers both young and old to be heard. This magazine, guest-edited
by prize-winning poet and former Houghton Mifflin editor Lawrence
Kessenich, is an example of work by the Bards.
Perhaps other communities of writers might want to create the
equivalent in their own locales: drop-in, open, easy, non-hierarchical,
generous, and helpful to all who write.
Meanwhile, dear writers and readers, welcome to these pages.
Thank you for taking a look.

The Bagel Bards are a loose group of local writers, many of them
poets, who meet once a week at the welcoming coffee shop Au Bon Pain
in Davis Square, Somerville, Massachusetts to share coffee and bagels.
But most importantly, they share information about the writing trade.
They are a networking group for writers in the area.
The brain child of at least four superb and conscientious writers,
Doug Holder, Harris Gardner, Steve Glines and Irene Koronos, the
Bagel Bards have been meeting weekly for years, providing a haven
for local writers and publishers engaged in the solitary practice of the
wordsmith profession. Writing and reading are the shared passions.
Bagel Bards range in age from 19 to 94-plus.
The Bards exist to share fellowship and information. Here is where
you learn who is publishing or has just published what. Who is looking
for a job? Who is offering one? Who is teaching or putting on a performance?
Who is starting a press? How do you lay out a Web site? What’s
great to read right now? What magazines are looking for work?
Luckily, this is not a place to parade one’s ego or one’s poems,
or even to workshop poems. The Bagel Bards are discreet, respectful
and—how rare!—non-hierarchical. They offer the local writer, whether
young or advanced, academic or not, a non-competitive and welcoming
community. It’s all about sharing information on writing and publishing.
New independent presses have arisen from the Bagel Bards—there
are at least four at this count as well as many journals. There are other
creative spin-offs, too. The Bagel Bards and its affiliates put out weekly
newsletters and news of the Boston small press scene. There are interviews
on cable TV, online and print mags, Web design, etc. In our
community, The Grolier Poetry Bookshop is a touchstone and the
Bagel Bards is our local networking group, supportive and welcoming,
Writing from the Bagel Bards membership is widely published.
We celebrate each triumph among us and encourage each other. New
reading series have been created as well as many other opportunities for
writers both young and old to be heard. This magazine, guest-edited
by prize-winning poet and former Houghton Mifflin editor Lawrence
Kessenich, is an example of work by the Bards.
Perhaps other communities of writers might want to create the
equivalent in their own locales: drop-in, open, easy, non-hierarchical,
generous, and helpful to all who write.
Meanwhile, dear writers and readers, welcome to these pages.
Thank you for taking a look.

The Bagel Bards are a loose group of local writers, many of them
poets, who meet once a week at the welcoming coffee shop Au Bon Pain
in Davis Square, Somerville, Massachusetts to share coffee and bagels.
But most importantly, they share information about the writing trade.
They are a networking group for writers in the area.
The brain child of at least four superb and conscientious writers,
Doug Holder, Harris Gardner, Steve Glines and Irene Koronos, the
Bagel Bards have been meeting weekly for years, providing a haven
for local writers and publishers engaged in the solitary practice of the
wordsmith profession. Writing and reading are the shared passions.
Bagel Bards range in age from 19 to 94-plus.
The Bards exist to share fellowship and information. Here is where
you learn who is publishing or has just published what. Who is looking
for a job? Who is offering one? Who is teaching or putting on a performance?
Who is starting a press? How do you lay out a Web site? What’s
great to read right now? What magazines are looking for work?
Luckily, this is not a place to parade one’s ego or one’s poems,
or even to workshop poems. The Bagel Bards are discreet, respectful
and—how rare!—non-hierarchical. They offer the local writer, whether
young or advanced, academic or not, a non-competitive and welcoming
community. It’s all about sharing information on writing and publishing.
New independent presses have arisen from the Bagel Bards—there
are at least four at this count as well as many journals. There are other
creative spin-offs, too. The Bagel Bards and its affiliates put out weekly
newsletters and news of the Boston small press scene. There are interviews
on cable TV, online and print mags, Web design, etc. In our
community, The Grolier Poetry Bookshop is a touchstone and the
Bagel Bards is our local networking group, supportive and welcoming,
Writing from the Bagel Bards membership is widely published.
We celebrate each triumph among us and encourage each other. New
reading series have been created as well as many other opportunities for
writers both young and old to be heard. This magazine, guest-edited
by prize-winning poet and former Houghton Mifflin editor Lawrence
Kessenich, is an example of work by the Bards.
Perhaps other communities of writers might want to create the
equivalent in their own locales: drop-in, open, easy, non-hierarchical,
generous, and helpful to all who write.
Meanwhile, dear writers and readers, welcome to these pages.
Thank you for taking a look.



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