AuthorsDen.com   Join (Free!) | Login  

     Popular! Books, Stories, Articles, Poetry
   Services MarketPlace (Free to post!)
Where Authors and Readers come together!

SIGNED BOOKS    AUTHORS    eBOOKS new!     BOOKS    STORIES    ARTICLES    POETRY    BLOGS    NEWS    EVENTS    VIDEOS    GOLD    SUCCESS    TESTIMONIALS

Featured Authors:  Herman Yenwo, iA.J. Mahari, iR. Glenn Brown, iJanice Scott, iLinda Frank, iMike Monahan, iAndrew Feder, i

  Home > Blogs Popular: Books, Stories, Articles, Poetry     

Seed4ever D. D.

· Become a Fan
· Contact me
· Poetry
· Blog
· Messages
· 443 Titles
· 1,008 Reviews
· Share with Friends!
·
Member Since: Nov, 2006

Seed4ever D. D., click here to update your pages on AuthorsDen.


Featured Book
September Dawn
by C Schutter

“I didn’t choose love, it chose me.” Emily Hudson, on September 11, 1857. Based on one of America’s most horrific, historical events, this is the story of an improbab..  
BookAds by Silver
Gold and Platinum Members










Blogs by Seed4ever D. D.

Too Many Cattle
1/1/2007 11:17:42 PM
approximately 1.3 billion cattle on earth at any one time.

Too Many Cattle

Cute cow. Harmful industry.The use of antibiotics in livestock is only one small part of how we are affected by this industry. According to a paper published in 1996, there are approximately 1.3 billion cattle on earth at any one time. They exist "artificially" in these vast numbers to satisfy the excessive human demand for their meat and byproducts. It takes an average of 2,500 gallons of water to produce a single pound of meat. According to Newsweek magazine, "the water that goes into a 1,000 pound steer could float a destroyer." In contrast, it takes only 25 gallons of water to produce one pound of wheat.

Cause and effectThere are other harmful effects of the beef industry on the environment. Methane is one of the four greenhouse gasses that contributes to the environmental trend known as global warming. The 1.3 billion cattle produce one fifth of all the methane emitted into the atmosphere. It is estimated that 200 years ago, American farmland had topsoil that averaged 21 inches in depth. Today, only about 6 inches remain. Every year in the United States, an area the size of Connecticut is lost to topsoil erosion - 85% of which is associated with livestock production. The statistics go on and on. The issue of living conditions and methods of slaughter is also disturbing and worth investigating if you desire.
(Back to top of page.)



Post a Comment

More Blogs by Seed4ever D. D.
• Mustang Man - Tuesday, January 29, 2008
• Looking Good - Thursday, March 29, 2007
•  Too Many Cattle - Monday, January 01, 2007  


Authors alphabetically: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Featured Authors | New to AuthorsDen? | Add AuthorsDen to your Site
Share AD with your friends | Need Help? | About us


Problem with this page?   Report it to AuthorsDen
© AuthorsDen, Inc. All rights reserved.