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Tahiba A. June

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Member Since: Jul, 2010

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What The Eyes See
By Tahiba A. June
Wednesday, July 14, 2010

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It is story based on a tru life story as told my father.

We ran. We walked. We played. We called ourselves names as we made our way to the farm. I was the youngest and the only one in school. I was always the envy of my brothers and well, I am my grandmother’s favorite.
My grandmother’s farm was far from our house but we never complain whenever we were asked to go there. There were rows upon rows of fruit trees on her farm. There were mango trees, pawpaw trees, cashew trees and several others; all in neat rows like soldiers on parade. Picking the fruits was always a competition that I never won but that particular day I was determined to pick as much as I could because I had promised Bimpe some fruits. She was a classmate that I love her like my age could measure and was always doing things to impress her even when my brothers call me names. They had started laughing at me again. They called me a silly toad and I called them dull brains and waited for what was coming. The fight was brief but the result was my tired arms. They started running as I trailed behind but I stopped a while to collect mushrooms for grandma only to notice that they had left me behind.
I walked carefully so as not to crush my mushrooms till I got to a place that looked like footpaths but I wasn’t sure. I looked around with fear. I wished someone would just jump out and tell me it was just a prank but nobody did. I felt the urge to cry out my brothers’ names but my little pride won the fight. I braced myself and took one of the paths. Minutes later however, I was completely lost. It had grown darker and my stomach had started to ache for food. The tears that had been threatening finally came down. I turned around and started walking back towards were I thought I came from but it seemed like I was going deeper into the bush. The relief that filled me up when I came to a clear area was too much to describe. I saw a bundle of firewood on the ground and a cutlass was pushed into the soil. My heart leapt out. My stomach grumbled again and I ate one of my mangoes. I sat on the ground beside the firewood and waited. Sleep came as I did and my head dropped.
“Segun…Segun…you need to wake up.”
I was dreaming but the voice sounded like it was not from the dream. I felt a sudden chill from the depth of my stomach and I opened my eyes. My grandmother was standing a few steps from me. I jumped up and ran to meet her but she stopped me.
“You are not supposed to be here. Stand up now and start going home. Your daddy is very worried. Go straight ahead until you get to the main road. You should know your way from there,” she said as she went in the opposite direction.
 “Where are you going, grandma? It is getting late and I have the mushrooms already.”
 She didn’t look back. I shrugged, picked up the firewood and cutlass and went towards the direction she’d given me.
 I got to the house to meet people standing around in groups and talking in low tones. Something felt strange about them but I ignored them and went into the house to start my evening chores. My daddy was in the sitting room with some men. I greeted them
 “Why are you just coming home? Your brother said you left them and wandered off.”
 I told him what my brother did to me at the farm
 “It was grandma that came to show me the way back,” I said finally and all the eyes in the room went round.
 “You saw who?” one man asked from a corner.
 “I saw grandma as she was coming to collect mushrooms.”
 My daddy stood up, held my hand and led me towards grandma’s room. I followed meekly wondering what was going on.
 I perceived the faint smell of wet soil when we entered grandma’s room. She was lying on her bed very still. I moved to her side and looked down at her.
 “She is dead Segun. How could you have seen her at the farm,” my daddy said. I shook my head. I shook grandma. I thought I saw her smile but her body felt cold and stiff. She looked peaceful like she was just taking a nap. I looked up at my daddy. Who would believe that I saw her? Why did she come to the farm if she was already dead? My little mind was confused. My daddy drew me to his side as his tears came down. I wanted to say something, anything but the words stuck.
 I felt that chill again and then I saw grandma drifting out of the room through the window. I pointed but my daddy shook his head.
 Grandma made a 360 degree in midair and she was gone.
 


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