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Robert Livingston

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The Stellar
by Robert Livingston   

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Books by Robert Livingston
· The Stellar III: Yoru Doragon
· The Stellar II: Sigh
                >> View all

Category: 

Science Fiction

Publisher:  Lulu Type: 
Pages: 

315

Copyright:  July 10, 2009 ISBN-13:  9780557089710
Fiction

THE STELLAR books are a continuous contemporary sci-fi story about two beautiful twenty-something women, Kitara Littlehawk and Marika Anderson, and their plight after encountering aliens out on a Texas country road.

Lulu
Official website of The Stellar books

 Kitara Littlehawk and Marika Anderson never expected that a back road meeting out on the Texas plains would change their lives. They surely weren't expecting to encounter visitors from another planet. And they definitely didn't expect to be endowed with an alien energy powerful enough to destroy a small solar system.

But now they must deal with the Yakuza, face intergalactic assassins, and prepare to defend Earth from the Zar - an invader powerful enough to snatch a planet from its orbit. For Kitara and Marika have now become THE STELLAR.

 (NOTE: Contains occasional profanity, sex and violence. This book is not suitable for children.)


Excerpt

Kitara and Marika were wise enough to wait until everyone had left for the day before talking with Jason. He requested they talk in his office to maximize privacy. Now, finally alone with them, he was ready to begin their journey of discovery.
Jason was at his desk when they entered and seated themselves across from him. Both girls were wearing different color bathrobes with silk pajamas of differing styles and colors underneath, and differing slippers. Jason quickly noted how frightened and nervous they both appeared.
“Please relax,” said Jason. “I know that this is a scary thing, but it may not be as bad as it seems. It least I hope not. OK—maybe I should start by trying to explain what probably happened to you two. As I understand it—Marika, you pulled off to the side of the road to relieve yourself, and Kitara, you stopped to do a routine check on Marika’s vehicle because you saw it on the side of the road. Do either of you remember that much?”
Both Marika and Kitara nodded.
“OK,” said Jason. “Now—here comes the strange and unbelievable part. It seems that while you were doing that, visitors from another planet—a planet called Japhor—came by and delivered some kind of power stored in an orb to you. How they did it I don’t know, and obviously you can’t remember, but now that power is inside of the two of you.”
“You’re kidding,” said Marika, more baffled than surprised.
“How do you know all of this?” asked Kitara.
“Last night one of them—one who called himself Juso Kodam—came. He wanted to see you. After he did, he told me most of everything.”
“So he was from another planet,” said Kitara. “As weird as it sounds, somehow I knew that.”
“So did I,” agreed Marika. “But why?”
“He told me a lot about why you are the way you are,” said Jason. “You were just chosen—that’s all.”
“He said we were our people’s only hope,” said Marika.
“I know,” said Jason. “Well, I don’t know what he said to you since he communicated by telepathy. But the way I understand it, you are to save our planet from some kind of space invader that is soon to arrive.”
Marika and Kitara looked at each other. If it weren’t so serious, they would have laughed.
“But how is that supposed to be?” asked Kitara. “What can we do?”
“Someone told us we wrapped a stethoscope around some guy’s throat,” said Marika, “but I don’t think doing that is going to save the world.”
“Probably not.” said Jason. “But it appears that that’s not your ultimate ability.”
“Then what is?” asked Kitara.
Jason shifted in his seat. “This is really weird—but as I understand it, you two are to form some kind of weapon.”
“Weapon?” asked Marika. “What weapon?”
“Something Juso called a stellar.”
“Yeah—I remember,” said Marika. “That’s what you called it last night.”
“And what is this stellar?” asked Kitara.
“You guys asked me that last night. But I thought you would know. You’re suppose to become it!”
Kitara glanced at Marika before saying, “Well, we don’t know. What is it suppose to be? And what do we do to become it?”
“I don’t know either. Even Juso couldn’t describe it. He just said it was very powerful. Powerful enough to destroy a solar system! And I’d say that’s awfully powerful! As I understand it, earth is about to be challenged by something we’re incapable of defending ourselves against. The Japhorians are aware of the power of this menace and have decided to help us by providing the only weapon they think can save us. And that weapon is suppose to be the two of you joined together as this stellar thing.”
“Well, you’re right. It sounds really weird.”
“But—still—why us?” Marika dolefully said.
“It wasn’t supposed to be you,” replied Jason. “It was supposed to be two fighters—you know, like soldiers in the military. But those who brought the orb got lazy or stupid or whatever and loosed it on the first two they saw together, which happened to be you.”
“Damn,” Kitara muttered. “Nighttime. The two of us out in the middle of nowhere. No one around to see it. I guess we were just asking for it, huh?”
“So—now what?” asked Marika.
“Well—evidently neither of you know what this stellar is—and I sure don’t. But perhaps we can figure it out together.”
“Why do we have to do this?” asked Kitara. “Why can’t they take it back and go find those soldiers instead?”
“As I understand it, once you got it, you got it,” Jason humbly returned. He chose not to tell more.
Kitara looked at Marika. “Well, I guess we got some of those answers we wanted,” she said.
Marika said nothing, but her countenance revealed her disapprobation.
Jason said, “Listen—don’t despair. Let’s take it one step at a time.”
“It is a damn shitty thing to make us a weapon without our consent!” Kitara retorted.
Jason acquiesced, “Yes—I agree.”
“To screw up our lives like this,” continued Kitara. “And we don’t even know what we are!”
This time Jason said nothing.
“So, how do we tell our families?” said Marika.
Jason hesitated. “I don’t think you should—at least not yet.”
“Why?”
“Because, like you said, you don’t fully know what you are to become yet. How can you explain it to them? Even I don’t have all the answers. But Juso did say he’d return again later to help you.”
Marika said to Kitara, “I don’t know how we’re supposed to become this stellar thing, but all I want to do is get on with my life. I have a college in England to attend!”
“And I’m a state trooper!”
“Listen, maybe the two of you should try to become the stellar right now,” said Jason, forgetting Juso’s admonition for them to do it alone.
“How?” Kitara loudly returned. “We’ve already said we don’t know what the damn thing is! We certainly don’t know what to do! And I certainly don’t want to go out and destroy the universe if we did become the freakin’ thing anyway!”
In an attempt to calm her, Jason softly said, “Like I said, Juso told me he would return to help you develop the weapon when the time came.”
“Maybe it’s best this Juso didn’t return!” stormed Kitara. “If I am the weapon when he shows up, I just might shoot him!”
Jason found he liked this beautiful, assertive young woman, and was actually glad she was still available. He was also fully aware of what she and Marika were going through. The comas were nothing. He knew their real suffering was now, and had said as much to Juso.
He glanced at Marika. A tear had rolled from her right eye to her chin, which she didn’t try to wipe away. Kitara was too angry to cry and was breathing heavily. With deep empathy, Jason arose from his seat and walked over to where they were seated.
“Kitara, Marika—I think this is bigger than just the two of you. First, you’ve been visited by extraterrestrial beings, and I am assuming that maybe you’ve been given a gift. Possibly even a miracle. But undoubtedly an opportunity to do something really, really great. I don’t completely understand what is suppose to happen to our planet, but if this stellar can stop it then that’s something certainly not to thumb our noses at.”
“But it’s not fair, Jason,” said Kitara with a humbled tone. Now she was close to tears. And he noted that it was the first time either of them called him by his first name.
“I know it’s not,” he said, coming up behind them and placing an arm around each one’s shoulders. “Who ever said life was fair, my dears?”
“Still, the question of what we should do to make this stellar thing hasn’t been answered,” said Marika, finally wiping her face with her right hand.
“Well—let’s look at it,” Jason said as he went over and stood in front of his desk. He then leaned back against it and asked, “What do you feel? What do you think? Do you see something? Are there any instinctive tendencies or abnormal urges? You know—do you feel like doing something or saying something or going somewhere? Whatever. Think about it.”
“Well . . . yes,” said Marika after a thought.
“I don’t mean like going home,” Jason chuckled.
“No . . . it’s something else.”
“Like what?”
Marika glanced at Kitara before answering. “I feel I should touch Kitara—or, maybe, more like I should embrace her or something. It feels the strongest when I’m close to her.”
Kitara stared at her like it was a revelation. Her response was emphatic. “You too?”
“It’s not a lesbian thing, or anything like that!” Marika retorted. “It’s just -”
“I know—I know,” Kitara interrupted. “I feel the same way. I’ve felt it ever since I saw you this morning!”
“Me, too,” Marika responded. “But what does it mean?”
“It means that maybe you two should do it,” said Jason, adding with a wry smile, “I promise I won’t tell anyone. Go ahead. Embrace.”
Marika slowly stood first and then Kitara. Marika held open her arms and Kitara followed suit. They then came together in a close, gentle hug.
And it happened. The flash of light and resultant repercussion of noise literally knocked Jason over his desk. Papers, books, pens and any other loose object went flying about the room as if someone had momentarily opened a door and let in a strong wind. Wall hangings fell down. His desk also moved back several feet, pushing him with it. Though the explosion hadn’t actually been enough to destroy anything, it made a tremendous mess. When things finally settled, Jason slowly picked himself off the floor and peered over the desktop.
What he saw was nothing less than unbelievable. Or better yet: miraculous.
He stared incredulously. Where the girls had stood embracing was now something else. It was bluish-silver in color and nearly reflected light as well as a mirror—yet it was translucent. Jason could actually see through it, albeit with distortion. The creature reminded him somewhat of a robot, because it looked as if it had been cast in a mold. It was fluid and streamlined—there were no sharp corners, seams or edges. The eyes, nose and mouth—even the fingernails—were all there, but the face was a mask. The eyes barely moved and the mouth didn’t move at all. Though it was human-like, it definitely wasn’t human.
Jason got to his feet, then slowly, with some hesitation, walked toward it. It was looking at itself, its arms, hands and body—observing itself for the first time. Jason noticed that the closer he got, the less light was reflected and the clearer he could see it. When he finally stood before it, it looked at him.
“So . . . this must be a stellar,” he said with a wary quietness, almost a whisper.
It nodded.




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