AuthorsDen.com   Join (Free!) | Login  

     Popular! Books, Stories, Articles, Poetry
   Services MarketPlace (Free to post!)
Where Authors and Readers come together!

SIGNED BOOKS    AUTHORS    eBOOKS new!     BOOKS    STORIES    ARTICLES    POETRY    BLOGS    NEWS    EVENTS    VIDEOS    GOLD    SUCCESS    TESTIMONIALS

Featured Authors:  J. Allen Wilson, iAmy Sellers, iJames Boyle, iDonald Beaulieu, iCatriona King, iFrank Whyte, iJoan Hovey, i

  Home > Language > Articles Popular: Books, Stories, Articles, Poetry     

Guy Hogan

· Become a Fan
· Contact me
· Books
· Articles
· Poetry
· News
· Stories
· 79 Titles
· 279 Reviews
· Save to My Library
· Share with Friends!
·
Member Since: Dec, 2006

Guy Hogan, click here to update your pages on AuthorsDen.




   Recent articles by
Guy Hogan

An Observation
Steeler Sunday
9/11 Revisited
Drama
Should You Keep A Journal?
Blogging
Review Of Compressionism: The Pittsburgh Stories
Random Thoughts Of A Writer #2
What Is Compressionism?
The Sweet Life
Where To Send Your Story
What Does An Editor Do?
           >> View all

Description Is Exposition
By Guy Hogan   
Not "rated" by the Author.
Last edited: Saturday, September 01, 2007
Posted: Monday, January 15, 2007

Share    Print   Save    Become a Fan


Flash Fiction / Pittsburgh / Blogging

If you're writing a 600-1,500-word story the scene is one of your most powerful tools to make the story come alive for the reader. In the scene there is conflict and action and dialogue. You are showing and not telling.

But to break up this blur of movement you may want to throw in some description: let the reader know where the story is taking place, what your characters are wearing and what they look like. Excellent. Just keep in mind that the locale of your story, what your characters are wearing and what they look like should be "intentional." Description must have a purpose.

Don't mention a character's blue eyes simply because you think blue eyes are pretty. Don't mention that the color of a woman's dress is red because it's the color that popped into your head at the time. You want to be in more control of your craft than that. What pops into your head during that rush to get words down on paper during the writing of the first draft is fine; but during revision ask yourself, does the color of his eyes move the story forward? Does the color of her dress explain something about her?

In other words, description must do at least two things. It must ground the reader in the physical world of the story and it must tell the reader something more about the story than the reader's senses can detect. So that in the world of your story a kitchen is more than just a kitchen. A river is more than just a river. And a color is more than just a color.

When you get a pattern of these signifers going your story will begin to echo with an undercurrent of meaning, an undercurrent of meaning that you are in some conscious control over. You won't have total control over your signifiers because your subconscious will have something to say about that. The control that you do have will make your story deeper. And the shorter a story is the deeper it should be.

Web Site: Welcome To My World


Reader Reviews for "Description Is Exposition"


Want to review or comment on this article?
Click here to login!


Need a FREE Reader Membership?
Click here for your Membership!


Reviewed by Randall Barfield 1/15/2007
very good and useful advice/i will try to put it into practice though planning and succeeding are 2 different things, as you probably know...also, go change "then the reader's senses" to than and "fellow" the prompts to follow. i surely know you are not stupid, it's like you said, after you type something you are blind the next moments, etc. much luck with this one
Reviewed by Jennifer Butler 1/15/2007
Great suggestions. Thank you.

Bridging the Gap: Police - Japanese, Fifth Edition by Robert Wood

Nonverbal Japanese language communicator primarily for English speakers. Easy to use reference. Proven and effective tool...  
Featured BookAds by Silver
Gold and Platinum Members


Bridging the Gap: Police - Japanese, Third Edition by Robert Wood

Nonverbal Japanese language communicator primarily for English speakers. Easy to use reference. Proven and effective tool...  
Featured BookAds by Silver
Gold and Platinum Members

Authors alphabetically: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Featured Authors | New to AuthorsDen? | Add AuthorsDen to your Site
Share AD with your friends | Need Help? | About us


Problem with this page?   Report it to AuthorsDen
AuthorsDen, Inc. All rights reserved.